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November 26, 2015

  • November 26, 2015
  • 3 Minute Read

Thanks for joining us for part 2 of our series on the ACE Saltwater Sanitizing System! Today we’ll answer some questions about Active Oxygen and the Vanishing Act Calcium Remover. Let’s get started.

What is Active Oxygen?

Active Oxygen is a term used to describe a powerful oxidizer (·OH) which is derived from water (H2O) – it’s important to note that Active Oxygen is different from oxygen (O2) derived Ozone (O3). Active Oxygen is created when energy transferred into the water breaks apart water molecules. Without the diamond electrode there is not enough energy to split apart water and create Active Oxygen, which means that – since no other system utilizes a diamond electrode – no other salt water chlorine system can create this oxidizer. This process is known as “advanced oxidation” and is used to treat water in a variety of other industries. It’s also used to purify groundwater and wastewater, as well as to treat water used in food manufacturing facilities and in breweries.

What is the benefit of Active Oxygen?

The benefit of Active Oxygen is that it has the ability to break down waste and contaminants completely with oxygen, leaving behind only carbon dioxide and water. It does not leave behind chloramines or other byproducts that can cause hot tub water to be irritating to the skin and eyes, or to cause a strong, unpleasant odor. The ACE system cleans hot tub water by first generating Active Oxygen which, in turn, reacts with the added sodium chloride salt to create chlorine, an EPA approved sanitizer that removes any additional contaminants introduced into the water.

So, what’s the scoop on Vanishing Act Calcium Remover?

The Vanishing Act Calcium Remover is a revolutionary new product (patent-pending) that physically removes calcium from the water, making it easy to achieve reduced calcium hardness levels that meet the latest guidelines (In some regions the Vanishing Act Calcium Remover may not be necessary.) Adjusting the calcium hardness level of hot tub water is a normal part of the water balancing process and the accumulation of scale caused by high levels of calcium hardness can be detrimental to hot tub components like the jet pumps and heater, as well as the electrodes within the ACE system. All hot tub owners can benefit from the Vanishing Act calcium remover which helps to protect hot tub components, and to make hot tub water feel softer. Plus, the Vanishing Act calcium remover is the best option to achieve the ACE system’s recommended calcium hardness level (50ppm) for improved operation and minimized cell cleaning.

Why do I need to remove calcium from the water?

Removing calcium from the water reduces the need for additional chemicals, like stain and scale, which only temporarily treat calcium in the water. This means there is one less bottle to pour, and also helps to extend the life of the water in your hot tub. The Vanishing Act calcium remover can be used at start-up or anytime the hardness level tests above the recommended range (25 – 75 ppm for ACE owners). It takes 3 – 24 hours to remove excess calcium from the water depending on the hot tub model; however, it’s perfectly safe to use the hot tub while the Vanishing Act calcium remover is at work; there is no need to wait! If scale does accumulate on the ACE system electrodes, it can easily be removed by soaking the ACE cell in a simple solution of pH down and spa water for 10 minutes. An empty bottle with cell cleaning instructions on the label is included with the ACE kit for convenience. The cell should be cleaned this way once every three months as preventative maintenance.

So, there you have it! The ACE Saltwater Sanitizing System is pretty amazing if we do say so ourselves (we use it in our own spas, so we know firsthand). If you’re interested in more information on the ACE saltwater system – or any of our other products and services – please don’t hesitate to give Bonsall Pool and Hot Tubs in Lincoln, Nebraska, a call.